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ALTERATIONS
AQUEOUS COATING
ARTWORK
BLANKET
BLEED
BLUELINE
BRIGHTNESS
CAMERA READY
CMYK
COLOUR BREAK
COLOUR PROOF CONTRAST
COPY
CROP MARK
DOT GAIN
DPI
ELECTRONIC FILES
EPS
FLAT FOLD MARKS
HALFTONE
IMAGE AREA
KNOCKOUTS or REVERSES
LINE SCREEN
MOIRE
OPACITY
PDF
PLATE
PMS COLOURS
POSTSCRIPT
PROCESS COLOURS
RE-SCREEN
RESOLUTION
RGB
RIP
SCREEN ANGLE
STRIPPING
SPOT COLOUR
TEXT TYPE
THUMBNAIL SKETCH
TIFF
TRAPPING
TRIM SIZE
UV COATING
VARNISH


Alterations:
Any changes required to be made to supplied artwork, electronic files or furnished films.

Aqueous Coating:

Aqueous finish coating is the strongest and most durable of the inline coatings. You get a printed piece that will last longer and have greater iridescent qualities. As well, since the ink is covered with a coating, no smudging will occur during die cutting or folding. Aqueous coating whitens the stock and will not yellow over time. An important plus is that it’s also environmentally friendly and fully recyclable.

Artwork
Refers to any illustrations, drawings, photographs, renderings, paintiings, sketches, or copy of any kind excluding text copy that is being prepared or used for reproduction.

Blanket:

Rubber surface material stretched around a cylinder. The image is transferred from the plate to the blanket to the paper.

Bleed:
Any printed image that extends beyond the trim. It may be solid copy, a screened image, or even a process colour picture. Bleeds for Beaver Small Box should be set for 1/8".

Blueline:
A proof that represents the finished product as a blue image on light sensitive paper. It is used to check work before it goes to press. Also called a dylux.

Brightness:
In colour theory it refers to the amount of light or paper white in an area. In reference to paper, it is the light reflectance or brilliance.

Camera Ready:

Art which requires no additional work before reproduction on the camera or digital transfer to film.

CMYK:
Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black. Represents ink colours used to print process jobs. Also called Process Colours.

Colour Break:
Usually a photocopy of the base art with colours marked and screens indicated using highlighters. Provided by the customer.

Colour Proof:

A colour proof of the printed product. Used to check position and colour but is not an exact representation of the final colours. Beaver Small Box offers a colour key which is a film based proof.

Contrast:
A high contrast image is made up of highlights and shadows with few gray tones. A low contrast image is mostly gray tones with few highlights or shadows.

Copy
Copy is text matter in a raw state that will be typeset or word-processed. Can also be referred to as manuscript. Copy can be submitted in hard copy, or electronic files.

Crop Mark:
Marks that show where the image is to be trimmed.


Dot Gain:

When a press reproduces the dots in a screen or halftone, these dots will print larger than they appear on the original copy or negative. This is due to the spread created when the paper absorbs the ink.

DPI:
Dots per inch. A measure of the resolution of a printer, scanner or monitor. Refers to the number of dots in a one-inch line. The more dots per inch, the higher the resolution.

Electronic Files
Any copy or artwork supplied digitally, either on a disk, or via email.

EPS:
Encapsulated PostScript. File format used to transfer PostScript image information from one program to another. Beaver Small Box accepts TIFF and EPS image file formats.

Flat:
Negatives that are taped to a carrier (mylar, rubylith film, goldenrod paper) ready for platemaking.

Fold Marks:
Marks at the top edge of a page showing where folds should go.

Halftone:

All photographs and drawings are continuous tone art. In order to be printed, continuous tones must be rendered as dots of varying sizes. In this way the printing press, which can only print solid colour, is able to simulate shades of gray. This image made up of dots is referred to as a halftone.

Image Area:

Also called the live area. This is where all your type should fall on a printed page. It is important to stay within these boundaries, otherwise the copy may not print, or be in an area where rollers and grippers may smear the ink during printing.

Knockouts or Reverses:

Should be no smaller than 12 point type when using black only and 14 point type when using a colour. Avoid serif type and knocking type out of multiple colours. Even slight misregistration becomes very obvious in such cases.

Line Screen:

The number of lines of dots per linear inch (lpi) in a screen, halftone or process separation. For Beaver Small Box, line screen of 150 lpi for halftone and tints is used. Also called screen ruling and screen frequency.

Moiré:
A repetitive interference pattern caused by overlapping symmetrical grids of dots or lines having differing pitch or angle. See Re-screen.

Opacity:
Papers ability to stop light and prevent show-through.

PDF:
Portable Document Format, allows you to pass documents between Acrobat software from computer to computer and operating systems. They are self reliant files that remain intact regardless of the platform they were created on. PDF can be created from PostScript files through Acrobat Distiller.

Plate:
A thin aluminium sheet with a photosensitive emulsion. The image to be printed is transferred to the plates from negatives or digital files. Then the plates are used on the press to print your product.

PMS Colours:
Short for Pantone Matching System, the best known and most widely used colour-matching system developed by Pantone. The Pantone colour is a mixture of some specific combination of nine Pantone Basic Colours plus Pantone Black and Pantone Transparent White. Each Pantone colour gets mixed according to formula, and then printed as a spot colour.

PostScript:
A page description programming language designed for high resolution output devices. Most PostScript programs are usually documents designed to be printed and are created by other software packages.

Process Colour / Full Colour Printing:
Reproductions are created using four basic colours-Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black (CMYK) to create the full spectrum of colours. four pieces of film are used to make four plates for printing.

Re-screen:
A printed halftone cannot always be used as camera-ready copy. If the screen ruling is too fine, or a halftone from a printed process picture is needed, prepress will have to shoot it again as a halftone. This may produce a slight but unavoidable moire pattern.

Resolution:
Refers to how sharp and clear an image is. Measured in pixels or dots per inch. The higher the resolution the greater the detail in the image, the larger the file and the longer it will take to output the file.

RGB:
Red, Green and Blue used to create colours on your monitor.

RIP:
Raster Image Process. The process of converting a page description language (PostScript) to a raster format for a specific output device.

Screen Angle:

In colour reproduction, angles at which the halftone screens are placed with relation to each other, to avoid moire patterns.

Stripping:
To assemble and prepare negatives into flats, to be used to expose printing plates.

Spot Colour:
Also called special colour. It is a solid, such as those defined by the Pantone Matching System (PMS), but not a process colour. Spot colour is mostly used for logo creation, headline types, duotone and other graphic elements. See PMS. black plus one spot colour, not CMYK output.

Text Type:
Main body type of a publication, usually referring to type smaller than 14 points. Type over 14 points is usually referred to as “display type” or headline.

Thumbnail Sketch:

A small rough sketch or layout.

TIFF:
Tagged Image File Format. A popular image file format supported by the majority of image-editing programs running on a variety of computer platforms. Beaver Small Box accepts TIFF and EPS image file formats.

Trapping:
Is the amount of overlap of two different, adjoining colours. This will compensate for misregistration on the press.

Trim Size:
The dimension of the Box after it has been die cut (trimmed) to its final size.

U.V. Coating:
A very high gloss finish applied to the sheet like a protective varnish. Exposure to ultraviolet light cures the finish to a brilliant shine. Must be applied to an enamel or coated paper. More shiny than varnish, but does not provide the protection of lamination. Tends to fingerprint on large areas of dark ink (wipes away easily).

Varnish:
Available in gloss or matte finish. A clear finish that seals the ink, offering protection against smearing and scuffing. Adds no durability to the product. Matte finish or spot varnish is available for an additional charge.